Mar
22
2013

Three-Chain Girl Blanket Edge

Three-Chain Girl Blanket Edge

For micro-fleece blanket

Download Free Pattern Here:  ThreeChainGirlEdge_pattern

blanket_edit

 

Level:

Easy to Intermediate

 

Materials:

  • 1 yard of micro-fleece or fleece divided in half (1 yard makes 2 blankets), unless you prefer to have it as large as 1 full yard
  • 1 skein of Simply Soft (6oz)
  • Hook size 2 – 2.5 mm for the 1st row
  • Hook size 3.25 – 3.75 mm for the rest of the project

 

Stitches:

sc = single crochet

ss = slip stitch

ch = chain

3-ch-sp = 3 chain space

picot = 3 chains, slip stitch into the 3rd chain from hook

 

 

Directions:

 

Read the note below (after directions to Row 5) to determine if you would like to calculate stitches.

 

Fabric preparation: fold 1 yard of fleece or micro-fleece in half, cut in half. Trim all edges until straight. Each half-yard piece makes one baby blanket. Do not hem or sew edges. They will stop fraying after you crochet the first row around the edge.

 

Row 1:

Begin anywhere but not at the corner.

You should have about 6-7sc per 1 inch. Make looser stitches if your micro-fleece gathers or make tighter stitches if your micro-fleece looks like lettuce leaves. It has to be flat to look good.

With smaller hook poke sc around the edge of the blanket, (poking holes and crocheting at the same time). Work 3sc into each corner hole. At the end of the row, ss into the 1st sc of the row.

 

 

Row 2:

Switch to a larger hook.

[(3ch, ss) into every other sc of the previous row] continue around except corners: (ss, 3ch, ss-into the same sc as previous ss) into each middle sc of each corner. Continue to the end of the row:

  • If you end up with last ss of the row nicely fitting in the pattern, then to start next row make 1 or 2 more slip stitches to move to the top of the 1st 3-ch-sp of this row.
  • If you are done with 3-ch-sps, but have 1 extra sc left in this row, make extra 3ch and slip stitch them into the top of the 1st 3-ch-sp of this row.

 

Row 3:

[(3ch, ss) into every 3-ch-sp of the previous row] around except corners: (ss, 3ch, ss – into the same 3-ch-sp as previous ss) into each corner 3-ch-sp. Continue to the end of the row:

  • If you end up with last ss of the row nicely fitting in the pattern, then to start next row make 1 or 2 more slip stitches to move to the top of the 1st 3-ch-sp of this row.
  • If you are done with 3-ch-sps, but have 1 extra sc left in this row, make extra 3ch and slip stitch them into the top of the 1st 3-ch-sp of this row.

 

Row 4:

Repeat Row 3.

 

Row 5:

[(picot, dc into the next 3-ch-sp, picot, dc into the same 3-ch-sp, picot, dc into the same 3-ch-sp, picot), ss into the next 3-ch-sp, ss into the next 3-ch-sp] around. Corners: make 1 extra dc and picot into each corner if your picot-dc motif ends up being worked into the corner 3-ch-sp. Finish off.

 

Note: I never count my stitches to make to look perfectly fit for the pattern. My corners often do not look the same, but I do not find it distractive. If you would like to make a perfectly fit edge, use this formula to calculate your stitches:

 

1stitch + 7x, where:

1 is the first stitch of the row;

7 is the number of single crochets in original row to create a complete motif in the last row;

x is the number of times you are able to repeat the motif around the edge.

Consider the fact that 3 single crochets you make to create a corner are part of the original 7 (as in 7x) Calculate where you would need to start your motif for each corner to look identical.

The top of the motif falls on single crochets number 3, 4, and 5 in each 7sc-motif. Good luck. I prefer not to calculate. I have never had an ugly blanket. Here are some examples of how my flawed uncalculated blankets look:

 

A perfect corner

perfect_corner_editjpg

An imperfect corner

flawed_corner_edit

 

Imperfect connection between motifs at the end of the last row:

flawed_edge_edit

 

If you feel like this is unacceptable, calculate your number of stitches given the formula above. If you like it despite little imperfections here and there, just dive into work and enjoy making it.

 

Finishing: You may lightly press your already made blanket with iron THROUGH a WET COTTON CLOTH! NEVER press it with iron without any medium in between. It does help to stretch gathered edges and flatten edges that look like lettuce.

 

 

Here are drawn schemes for this edge:

straight_edit

corner_edit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the Author: Arina Purcella

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